Posts Tagged Lena Luthor

Superhero Weekly: For Good, Book of Burial and Shrunk Team Flash

This is a bit of a weird week.

In order of pwnage, Supergirl is really tied with Black Lightning this week and The Flash is a very, very distant third. It’s a close call between the leads, but there were a few things this week that just stalled them both. I’m afraid The Flash is going to be sticking with third place for a while, specially with a story about shrinking people. Ok, let’s go.

Supergirl leads with For Good. Barely.

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(Source: The CW)

  • Literally, the show was pursuing a few things but the one extraordinary diamond in the rough that shines true was Katie McGrath playing Lena Luthor. The character has sort of an ambiguous aspect that always seems to be one step from the dark destiny of her family. It’s seeing Lena balance her act between accepting who she is and deciding who she wants to be that made the show for me and gives it the first place this week.
  • I wanted to feel for Samantha. However, I didn’t feel this character has actually had a lot of scenes with the rest of the cast for them to bond. It really feels a bit forced. Plus the fact that the show had to recall that Alex has a medical background (which I had to check, yes it was there) to have her scan Samantha at LexCorp Labs. Something just didn’t work with that scene.
  • The other one is the hallmark moment of Kara, Alex and Lena supporting Samantha. I like Samantha’s character because she’s complex, but the whole “BFFs” feels a little too naive for a buildup that is definitely going to hurt. Perhaps that’s the whole message, but this is looking a little too Disney right now.
  • Morgan Edge and Lillian Luthor are back. And they’re out. Their only good scenes were both of them confronting Lena Luthor. Also, one extra point for the scene in which Lena confesses to Kara that she tried to kill Edge, a moment that plays with Kara and the audience until we realize she’s talking about that time she went after him in a previous episode. That had us going for a moment.

Perhaps Black Lightning should’ve taken it this week with Lawanda: Book of Burial.

black-lightning-s1e3-burial

(Source: The CW)

  • Jefferson Pierce continues to be the most interesting character in the show. That being said, and I’m definitely nitpicking here I’m not sure how are we going to balance the realism that permeates the city of Freeland with the superhero aspect. Are we going for full dark and sinister? Are we going to be a little lighter sometimes enough to believe there’s hope? Right now, we don’t know the show so without compromise we’re not seeing neither good nor evil get the upper hand yet.
  • There’s interesting dynamics never before explored here. Inspector Henderson (Damon Gupton) representing the underpaid and overworked civil servant versus Reverend Jeremiah Holt (Clifton Powell) who lives from his congregation. I do have my reservations on whether the police inspector is dirty or not though…
  • The rising story is Anissa Pierce developing her powers and ending her relationship with Chenoa after flirting with newcomer Grace Choi (Chantal Thuy). Whether Anissa will become Thunder or Grace exhibit any of her comics’ counterpart meta-human abilities remains to be seen.
  • We also get another plot concerning Jennifer and her blossoming romance with Khalil. The fact that she’s planning to have sex and sharing this information with her parents is something new. However, Jefferson’s interaction with Khalil was just awkward and unnecessary.
  • The villains are definitely still at comic-book level. Seems even Tobias Whale (Marvin Jones the Third) must answer to a higher power. We meet Lady Eve (Jill Scott) who seems to be the only one able to challenge him. I know this is a superhero show and all, but switching from real community problems to James-Bond-esque villains chewing the scenery is a bit of a contrast.

And finally, The Flash lags behind with Honey, I Shrunk Team Flash.

flash-s4e12-shrunk

(Source: The CW)

  • I didn’t like when Arrow threw in shrinking with The Atom and I don’t think I liked it any better in this week’s episode. The baddie of the week is capable of shrinking objects and people in a way-too-convenient fashion. Again, I know this is a superhero universe but to blatantly ignore the law of the conservation of mass is something I can’t suspend my disbelief over. For me, it’s like if Star Wars’ R2-D2 was able to fly all this time.
  • Cecille can read minds now. No, I don’t buy it as a coincidence of her pregnancy. It has to be related to something else. If this is really random then… It’s really random. And lazy.
  • The one entertaining bit at the end was the warden discovering Barry and hauling him off to what looks like a meta-containment facility. Seems the warden is in cahoots with Amonet Black (Katee Sackhoff) aka the least convincing villain in the show. The fact that we’ll have Sackhoff doing her cringy evil-lyn act already anticipates the show ending in third place yet again. On the other hand, that also might mean some Killer Frost time.

That will do for now.

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Superhero Weekly: Damage & Girls Night Out

Spoilers are all about female empowerment this week.

It should really be more often, but both Supergirl and The Flash shone a light on their strongest female characters. The results were mixed, but welcomed. While Supergirl the relationship of Maggie Sawyer and Alex Danvers comes to a crossroad, The Flash tackled giving Iris a starring role alongside exploring the duality of Caitlin Snow and Killer Frost. Let’s get to it, then.

Damage

(Source: The CW)

Highs, Lows and Sanvers’ End:

  • Maggie Sawyer was, of all things, a fleshed out female character that was both strong and flawed. She may have been the best thing that has happened so far to Alex Danvers, but she was also the best thing that happened to the show.
  • In more ways than one, the end of the road for Alex and Maggie was even more important than the distance traveled. The show couldn’t just close that door without first giving us the pain of the separation. This was not Kara putting Mon-El on a space pod. This was the show giving us a human breakup of a human relationship without relying on death, sickness or completely changing the character at the last minute via cheating or supernatural event. Maggie walks out in the end, but it’s a decision and not a surprise.
  • Thanks to Floriana Lima for being Maggie Sawyer, a human character with depth and an agency. I do hope she makes a sporadic appearance here and there in the future.
  • On the other hand, we have Lena being framed by Morgan. That we all know that in the end it wasn’t really Lena’s fault and that Kara and Samantha were going to get to the truth of the matter was not really the point of this episode. It was all about Lena.
  • Kate McGrath has brought to live a Lena Luthor that’s both intriguing and inspirational. She’s always cool and in control… Up until now. Lena’s defenses are tested to the brink. Someone else is writing her narrative for her, over her. It’s seeing Lena weak that makes us really feel empathy for her. You don’t expect her to suddenly go Luthor on Morgan, but when she does she’s in a dark place.
  • In a Sith-like matter Lena basically gives in to the dark side because she refuses the victim card. She thinks she’s going to take the fall of it all anyway and rather than running away she runs towards it. In other words, she’d rather become the villain on her own terms than be framed by somebody else. I have to say, that makes her the strongest and most interesting character in the show. Of course Kara comes to the rescue and Lena redeems herself.
  • But in the back of my mind, Morgan should fear Lena’s reprisal far more than Supergirl’s. He’s right, Supergirl can inconvenience him greatly. Lena can make his life a living hell on earth.

Unbeknownst to anybody but the people watching, back on STAR Labs…

flash-s4e5-girls-night-out

(Source: The CW)

Highs, Lows, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde:

  • Yes, Iris was the leader this week. Barry and the guys end up at a strip joint because of Ralph Dibny because we don’t even want to suggest the other guys would ever suggest a strip club.
  • Cecille’s daughter Joanie is revealed as a stripper, a role she’s taken to write a book from a feminist perspective.
  • Barry makes for a funny drunk.
  • But nevermind all that, the real focus is on Frost’s past coming back to haunt her. That should have given us a clear shot at exploring their dynamic. The show is clearly trying to keep Frost from embracing her Killer persona to prevent a moral conflict, something that I kinda wish they’d make up their minds about.
  • Yes, it would be extremely dark to have Killer Frost actually kill someone since at that point the moralistic high ground is lost and the team would have to imprison Caitlin. However, I feel that angle could be explored. I’m getting too much vibes from Buffy The Vampire Slayer’s Faith here.
  • I almost feel this one was one that could’ve been left to both Iris and Caitlin alone, but Felicity comes along for the ride and… so does Cecille, which we really have had little time knowing at all. It’s a bit clunky and awkward how the episode is pulled through. The episode feels too busy with so many people moving from one location to another.
  • Amonet Black (Katee Sackhoff)… I really had a bit of a cringe moment taking her seriously as a villainess. Yes, the part with the cops and her reaction to “ma’am” was funny. She doesn’t scream “returning character role” for me, although I’m already hearing she might return in that role.
  • Danielle Panabaker’s Killer Frost had some good and bad moments this week, including some really great badass moments as well. I know we’re making her hold back because we want to keep her on the “good” side, but I wanted more snark from the Ice Queen. You’ve done it before, showrunners. I’m really tempted to think she was also held back to make sure she didn’t outshine Iris.
  • That being said, the entire plot was an excuse for bachelor / bachelorette shenanigans. I wasn’t even intrigued with the Thinker’s floating chair pursuing this Weeper guy. Overall, it felt a bit of a throwaway, and it would’ve been a waste without Frost to bring in some edge to it. I still feel like I we could use a full-on dark Killer Frost episode instead of this watered-down Shirley Temple drink version.

That will do for now.

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Superhero Weekly: Triggers & Mixed Signals

Spoilers will swear they will trust you from now on, then forget about it on the next episode.

It has become a CW trope, but it seems all conflicts are becoming some version of the main heroes overestimating their own powers, stop listening to their friends and family, getting into trouble and then everything getting fixed once teamwork, love and understanding are back on track. At least until next week, that is.

supergirl-s3e2-triggers

(Source: TheCW)

Highs, Lows and Girl Superpower:

  • Supervillain Psi (Yael Grobglas) has the power to cause fear. This creates a particularly cathartic opportunity for Kara to face her own, which she has been dodging since her season opener last week. Psi feels like it could’ve been more than a one-episode C-villain, but alas it seems it wasn’t to be.
  • Samantha Arias, the mother of the teenager that will get in trouble in every episode, is back. Seems she could turn out to have superpowers. I did expected the cast to grow, but no word on where this is going to go.
  • Was there any question that Lena was not going to end up buying CatCo? No. Why does every time I try to say “CatCo” out loud I end up saying “CostCo”? Don’t answer that one.
  • Lena can be a badass boss, as Kara discovers when she starts being uppity. I also hope Kara fixed that elevator before anybody else finds her purse and her glasses.
  • The dynamic at CatCo changes from now on. Let’s be honest, it needed to. James needs Lena pushing him. She will and she should. It was getting a little to comfy for him.
  • I’m expecting Kara to reveal to Lena she’s Supergirl any episode now. I’m also expecting Lena to tell her she has known that all along.
  • Supergirl seems to be going for a darker vibe. I really hope it’s temporary, but considering the other CW shows, I’m not holding my breath.

Meanwhile, back at STAR Labs…

flash-s4e2-mixed-signals

(Source: TheCW)

Highs, Lows and Romance Woes:

  • Gypsy gets a lot of good lines this episode: “It’s like he doesn’t know he’s a dead man.” (said at nobody after Cisco tries apologizing and figures out a way to stop a metahuman in the middle of the sentence).
  • Still loving Caitlin, but don’t think I don’t know what you’re doing, TV show. I know Caitlin’s Frost dilemma will be put in hold while the other stories take the stage. You’re literally putting her issues on ice until you have time to deal with them on another show. Hardly fair.
  • I did find laughter with Cisco and Gypsy (and Caitlin inadvertently getting a word in there) but there was a lot to cringe about with Iris and Barry. If you’re going to couples therapy to make fun of therapy why do it at all? Specially since they both really seem to need it.
  • Iris West finally comes out with it: Barry left her. I think the wedding is safely postponed (season finale I guess). How Barry is completely blind in not seeing that was going to be a major issues speaks volumes about self-centered he’s acting.
  • Barry has become a little too overconfident, not in his powers but in his persona. I’m actually finding him a more than a little annoying in this episode. Can you tell?
  • Where’s the next iteration of Harrison Wells?

So as you can see I’m doing a rather brief version of the Superhero Weekly (which might be bi-weekly at this point) due to time constraints. Now I just go directly into the Highs and Lows. It’s a bit experimental. We’ll see how it goes.

And yes, I’ve decided to drop Arrow. To be honest, it was getting hard to watch. I’ll take a peek now and then, but I don’t anticipate making it part of this review.

That will do for now.

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