Spoilers remind you to use protection.

Perhaps I am chasing experimental premises lately. This movie’s premise feels ludicrous at face value. You have something after you. If you have sex, it will go after that person. Your life and your ethics are in play here. This could’ve easily turn into one of those so-bad-it’s-good and horror-unintentionally-turns-to-comedy features. Surprisingly, it doesn’t. The movie’s tone never flinches and it always keeps you in tension.

(Credit: Northern Lights Films)

It Follows (2015) was written and directed by David Robert Mitchell. Jay (Maika Monroe) has a new boyfriend, Hugh (Jake Weary), who seems to be hiding something. After being intimate for the first time, she’s drugged and tied to a wheelchair. Hugh then explains that he’s passed on something to her. A curse where an unknown entity, with the ability to look like anybody, follows you at a slow pace until it gets you. The only way to delay it, is to have sex with someone else so they become the target.

(Credit: Northern Lights Films)

The first thing you start noticing are the clothes, the hairstyles, the cars and the background noises drop us smack in the middle of the 80’s. This is not confirmed by someone announcing the year or an ad mentioned the date. It’s left up to you to realize what’s happening and makes the film fits nicely with the next development. Jay’s only hope are not her parents or the police, but her circle of young friends.

(Credit: Northern Lights Films)

Jay’s sister Kelly (Lili Sepe) along with Paul (Keir Gilchrist), Yara (Olivia Luccardi) and neighborhood cool guy Greg (Daniel Zovatto) are onboard, even if they don’t immediately believe her. The pursuer after all, is only visible to Jay or someone else in the chain. An ethical dilemma presents as the incidents pile up and Jay starts considering her options. Although it would seem that this curse is a deterrent against sleeping around, it could turn to be its motivator.

(Credit: Northern Lights Films)

Highly recommended with little reservations. This is one of those films in which we get to see things in the distance, through the window, across the field, as our antagonist approaches and we’re not sure if we’re just seeing someone in the background or if it’s really it. The wide shots and the camera panning around heightens the sense of paranoia as you keep scanning the horizon. The slow pace might not please audiences that expect a high death toll, but for those willing to play the long game will find the movie will catch up to you when you’re least expecting it.

That will do for now.