(Source: Image Comics)
(Source: Image Comics)

Every so often I do stray off the beaten path of DC and Marvel, but to be honest I don’t go too far. It’s really hard to call Image an “independent” comic book but considering the financial reach that the major two powers hold specially with movies and merchandising now attached, it’s no wonder they look like the underdog. Case and point, I didn’t know that all three of my chosen comics to review today would turn out to be produced by Image.

Comic: Saga. Publisher: Image ComicsStory by: Brian K. Vaughan. Art By: Fiona Staples.

I just got into the Saga series just by word of mouth and I have to say this. Although for me the art usually is the one that sells me, this is one of those cases in which the story is really the reason to get into it. Not that the art is really bad, but if you just start getting screenshots you might be tempted to discard the idea of adding this to your pull list. Read up on the reviews and you’ll get curious on the plot – which has the epic proportions of a space opera. The very aptly name series has memorable characters that come off as intriguing yet familiar. Very recommended by people who know what comics are about a lot more than me, but I will tag along my late recommendation as well.

(Source: Image Comics)
(Source: Image Comics)

Comic: The Manhattan Projects. Publisher: Image ComicsStory by: Jonathan Hickman. Art By: Nick Pitarra & Cris Peter.

If there’s one thing that I could say about The Manhattan Projects is that I have a hard time looking at the art because it reminds me so much of the New 52’s Batman, Inc. (a comic that I’ve already explained that I can’t stand but gotta get anyway).

However, it’s comparing night and day for the outcome. The art works here. It’s a messy, over complicated jarring plot that somehow works and makes perfect sense – or perfect non-sense. Essentially a retelling of the outcomes of World War II and a completely alternate storyline or historyline if you prefer.

Start reading from the beginning and by the time you think you have everything down the tables will turn and you get lost. I would call it a perfect storm clusterfuck of history. I might drop it if it doesn’t go anywhere but so far every turn is adding more to the story and I can’t tell where it wants to go except it’s still pulling me along.

(Source: Image Comics)
(Source: Image Comics)

Comic: Great PacificPublisher: Image ComicsStory by: Joe Harris. Art By: Martin Morazzo.

I’ve left Great Pacific for last because, well it’s just not picking up yet but it seems promising. An island of trash becomes so large that it’s the size of a state and impossible to get rid off. One young billionaire fakes his own death, steals his own money and tries to create his own nation. There’s just something about the trash here and the recycling technologies involved that makes this comic a very, very topical story with an unusual, almost vindictive approach for every environmental disaster that comes up and we have no solution against. Plans fail, an underwater monster shows up and it all may end up having more twists than a George R. R. Martin novel in this comic. The plot needs to go somewhere but since I can’t figure it out how I want it to turn out, I just want to know what they’ll come up with.

That will do for now.

(Source: Image Comics)